picturedept:

Photojournalist Robert Nickelsberg has been covering Afghanistan since 1988, when the mujahideen were fighting to expel Soviet troops. In Afghanistan: A Distant War, his images tell the stories of military leaders, the Taliban, ordinary citizens, and American soldiers who are only the latest in a long line of occupying forces, most of whom withdrew unhappily. Many of Nickelsberg’s photographs show important events or military action, but some of the most affecting portray nothing more than Aghan people trying to get on with their lives.
Click here to see additional images. All images taken from Afghanistan: A Distant War, by Robert Nickelsberg (Prestel)

Bob and I used to knock around Central America in the bad old days. I can never see enough of his work. picturedept:

Photojournalist Robert Nickelsberg has been covering Afghanistan since 1988, when the mujahideen were fighting to expel Soviet troops. In Afghanistan: A Distant War, his images tell the stories of military leaders, the Taliban, ordinary citizens, and American soldiers who are only the latest in a long line of occupying forces, most of whom withdrew unhappily. Many of Nickelsberg’s photographs show important events or military action, but some of the most affecting portray nothing more than Aghan people trying to get on with their lives.
Click here to see additional images. All images taken from Afghanistan: A Distant War, by Robert Nickelsberg (Prestel)

Bob and I used to knock around Central America in the bad old days. I can never see enough of his work. picturedept:

Photojournalist Robert Nickelsberg has been covering Afghanistan since 1988, when the mujahideen were fighting to expel Soviet troops. In Afghanistan: A Distant War, his images tell the stories of military leaders, the Taliban, ordinary citizens, and American soldiers who are only the latest in a long line of occupying forces, most of whom withdrew unhappily. Many of Nickelsberg’s photographs show important events or military action, but some of the most affecting portray nothing more than Aghan people trying to get on with their lives.
Click here to see additional images. All images taken from Afghanistan: A Distant War, by Robert Nickelsberg (Prestel)

Bob and I used to knock around Central America in the bad old days. I can never see enough of his work. picturedept:

Photojournalist Robert Nickelsberg has been covering Afghanistan since 1988, when the mujahideen were fighting to expel Soviet troops. In Afghanistan: A Distant War, his images tell the stories of military leaders, the Taliban, ordinary citizens, and American soldiers who are only the latest in a long line of occupying forces, most of whom withdrew unhappily. Many of Nickelsberg’s photographs show important events or military action, but some of the most affecting portray nothing more than Aghan people trying to get on with their lives.
Click here to see additional images. All images taken from Afghanistan: A Distant War, by Robert Nickelsberg (Prestel)

Bob and I used to knock around Central America in the bad old days. I can never see enough of his work. picturedept:

Photojournalist Robert Nickelsberg has been covering Afghanistan since 1988, when the mujahideen were fighting to expel Soviet troops. In Afghanistan: A Distant War, his images tell the stories of military leaders, the Taliban, ordinary citizens, and American soldiers who are only the latest in a long line of occupying forces, most of whom withdrew unhappily. Many of Nickelsberg’s photographs show important events or military action, but some of the most affecting portray nothing more than Aghan people trying to get on with their lives.
Click here to see additional images. All images taken from Afghanistan: A Distant War, by Robert Nickelsberg (Prestel)

Bob and I used to knock around Central America in the bad old days. I can never see enough of his work.

picturedept:

Photojournalist Robert Nickelsberg has been covering Afghanistan since 1988, when the mujahideen were fighting to expel Soviet troops. In Afghanistan: A Distant War, his images tell the stories of military leaders, the Taliban, ordinary citizens, and American soldiers who are only the latest in a long line of occupying forces, most of whom withdrew unhappily. Many of Nickelsberg’s photographs show important events or military action, but some of the most affecting portray nothing more than Aghan people trying to get on with their lives.

Click here to see additional images. All images taken from Afghanistan: A Distant War, by Robert Nickelsberg (Prestel)

Bob and I used to knock around Central America in the bad old days. I can never see enough of his work.

The Forgotten Lives of Refugees

Christopher Dickey talks to António Guterres, the United Nations’ High Commissioner for Refugees, about the world’s desperate, dispirited, and displaced.

A gallery of amazing images: 15 Newsweek Photos Win Prestigious American Photography Awards (Photos), among them Gaza Beach, the Japan Quake, Tahrir Square, Afghanistan, and portraits of Angelina Jolie: http://t.co/8S209EiH

It’s good to see that our animated-liveaction “Occupation” video about Iraq, Afghanistan, Israel, Palestine, Occupy Wall Street and the Confederacy (all in three minutes) is now up on YouTube as well as TheDailyBeast.com.

In the latest installment of the Daily Beast Video ‘Op-Vid: Campaign 2012’ video series, Christopher Dickey explores the concept of ‘Occupation.’ It is a word spoken—and unspoken—that’s at the center of the issues in Iraq, Afghanistan, the Middle East and, yes, Wall Street. But what does it really mean? And what is its historical significance?

(Facebook and Twitter followers, note that one of the links sent earlier did not always play the video. This one should do fine. Please feel free to comment here or, better yet, on the Daily Beast site. Some of the posts are churlish and stupid, but there’s the start of an interesting discussion there: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/11/30/christopher-dickey-the-real-meaning-of-occupation-video.html#comments )

Based on 14 trips to Afghanistan between 1994 and 2010, A Darkness Visible: Afghanistan is the work of photojournalist Seamus Murphy. His work chronicles a people caught time and again in political turmoil, struggling to find their way. See the project at http://mediastorm.com/publication/a-darkness-visible-afghanistan

My friend Seamus Murphy’s new book “A Darkness Visible: Afghanistan,” is an extraordinary collection of photographs, and this film is a brilliant adaptation that will tell you more about the country in 30 minutes than you are likely to learn anywhere else in any amount of time.